Continuous Professional Development

GMSWA Training Brochure

Here we have information on a variety Continuous Professional Development (CPD) options available to social workers in Greater Manchester. CPD opportunities aim to support social work professional across all sectors, to develop their knowledge and skills in line with Knowledge and Skills Statement (KSS) and Department for Education & Professional Capabilities Framework (PCF).

To check out our current CPD training offers including Practice Education and events please see our brochure.

 

On Site Supervisor Courses for 2023/24

The University of Salford Social Work Department are pleased to offer a programme of teaching for experienced workers who want to work with social work students on placement in the role of On-Site Supervisor (OSS). In this scenario you will be working with an Off-Site Practice Educator and the course content will help you to understand the difference between the roles and the responsibility of each one. The course is 2 days in total and people need to attend both days. Both days will be in person. Due to room capacity, there are 40 places available. Priority will be given to agencies within Greater Manchester, agencies outside GM will be allocated if spaces are available.

The next course available at Salford University in 2023 – 24 is as follows:

Tuesday 2nd and Wednesday 3rd July 2024

 Programme Content:

Setting the scene
The PCF
Roles of different people involved
Planning and Preparing
Managing the placement and induction
Anti-oppressive practice as an OSS
Supervision
Teaching and Learning
Assessment and the role of OSS.

University of Salford students will be going out on placement in the Autumn of 2024.

If you would like to register for the course, or have any questions, please contact either Morna Rivers (m.rivers@salford.ac.uk) or Maxine Hamilton-Bell (M.R.Hamilton-Bell@salford.ac.uk).

GMSWA CPD and Workforce Group

GMSWA workforce group is made up of local authorities’ Principal social workers, workforce development leads, practice consultants and academic partners; senior lecturers and researchers. A key priority for the group is to understand its social work practitioner needs so that Greater Manchester has the highest calibre of social workers, with a good mix of ASYE’s and experienced social workers who receive a continuum of learning at pre and post qualifying levels, supervision and support in order to deliver the best social work services to GM. The group is supported by

Bev Johnson

Principle Social Worker Adults, Bury Council

Margaret Struthers

Senior Lecturer, Social Work, Manchester Metropolitan

Key Group activities:

  • Develop a Greater Manchester (GM) wide Workforce Strategy for Social Work to determine workforce needs and inform future projections across GM.
  • Undertake an analysis of the current workforce to examine the availability and supply of social workers as well as establishing the destination of newly qualified social workers.
  • To monitor the admissions into social work routes, collating data to forecast to establish numbers of newly qualified social workers coming though the HEI’s.
  • For HEI’s partners to align their CPD offer based on employers needs
  • Measure CPD that is offered to employers (children’s and adults) by taking an analysis of recruitment and retention across GM to inform the CPD and progression demands and then subsequent offers for social work.
  • For the group to ensure that its work programme is aligned and consistent with the other networks and groups within GM whose work programme/s are focussed in relation to this area. This includes the GM PSW Network for Adults and Children’s as well as the GM Workforce group

Return to Social Work

Update your skills, knowledge and experience as a social worker returning to practice.

As a previously registered social worker who has not been registered with Social Work England (SWE) for between 2-5 years, this course will enable you to apply to register and return to practice.

The programme is offered free to qualified social workers living or working within Greater Manchester who intend to work for a Greater Manchester local authority after completing their studies. Social workers from outside Greater Manchester can self- fund for £1500.

Any questions?

For Further Information, please see our brochure click here. or contact SHSprogrammes@manchester.ac.uk or  patricia.cartney@manchester.ac.uk

Apply today https://uom.link/sw-return pgtaught.socialwork@manchester.ac.uk

Practice Educator Training Programme

Practice Educator Masterclasses

Practitioner/ Teacher Status Programme

Careers Fairs

Our annual Careers Fair is an opportunity for Social Work students to find out what career opportunities are on offer across all our partners in Greater Manchester. 

The GMSWA Careers fair 2024 was hosted by Manchester Metropolitan University on 14th February 

The events included: 

  • Employer stalls
  • Social Work England Stall
  • Employability Workshops
  • Employers Panel
  • ASYE Panel and information workshop
  • Social Work Applications Workshop
  • Mock Interview Sessions
  • British Association of Social Workers (BASW)

Social Work Career Resources

Post Qualifying CPD

New programme in development. Details to be shared soon. 

Post Graduate Certificate in Applied Social Work Practice

Testimonials from Practice Research Week 2022:

“I attended multiple sessions. I thoroughly enjoyed the older perpetrators of abuse session, I found this very informative and engaging and I appreciated that it ran on time. Thank you”

"Further my knowledge, the mental capacity triage is great and will this forward in my practice, I lack confidence but getting better, hopefully im newly qualified”

“Reflective discussions helpful to think about work, relevant to role and support of vulnerable children and adults and where need to be going with that to support the workforce”

Testimonials from World Social Work Week 2022

“I thought all events were very relevant and very welcomed. I can appreciate a lot of hard work went into the overall planning and preparation so well done for the best Social Work day I've ever attended. Thanks again”.

“Being able to take a step back from day-to-day work and take stock of developments in the sector”

“Opportunity to connect with colleagues across GM and gain valuable CPD”

“I enjoyed that each session was an hour long and no group participation, allowing me to listen to the content's whilst still completing my work, very informative”

Testimonials from ASYE Core Skills 2022 Cohorts

Candidate from Cohort 2

“I find this training very inspiring and has made me more enthusiastic”

Candidate from Cohort 2

“Really enjoyed the training, the trainer is really knowledgeable, really enjoy listening to him, he breaks the information down so it is easy to understand, he always gives examples which really helps. He has a great sense of humour so makes the training lots of fun”

Candidate from Cohort 1


“Really enjoyable and informative session around relationship based practice and challenging practice”

Candidate from Cohort 1

“Course was relevant to my area of practice and there were several practical case studies that helped me understand and explore how to apply theory and legislation to practice”

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How is racism understood in literature about the experiences of black and minority ethnic social work students in Britain? A Conceptual review.​

Dr Dharman Jeyasingham and Dr Julie Morton (Social Work Education, 38 (5), pp 563-575)

Abstract

This article presents findings from a study which explored the everyday ways race works on social work programmes in England. The study focused on how race was spoken about and conceptualised, how people were categorised and ordered according to race and the social interactions where race was understood by participants to be significant. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with eight social work lecturers and nineteen black social work students at two universities in England, to explore the following topics: classroom-based and practice learning, assessment and feedback, interactions between students and between students and educators, and university and practice agency cultures. Data were analysed using thematic analysis and the following themes identified: the routine interpellation of black students and communities in terms of absolute cultural differences, black students’ everyday experiences of marginalisation, hostility and othering, and the racialisation of black students in judgements made about their academic and practice performance. The article concludes that social work education must engage more deeply with contemporary theorisations of race and culture, and that social work educators need a reflexive understanding of how notions such as diversity, equality and universal academic standards are put into practice in ways that marginalise and devalue black students.

Link to Research Article:
https://usir.salford.ac.uk/id/eprint/64217/?template=banner

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Children’s social workers agile working practice and experiences beyond the office

Dr Dharman Jeyasingham, The British Journal of Social Work, Volume 49, Issue 3, April 2019, Pages 559-576, https://doi.org/10.1093/bjsw/bcy077

Abstract

Agile working (flexibility around practitioners’ roles and the location and time of work) is increasingly common across local authority social work in the UK but there is little evidence about the practices it entails, with the small amount of existing research concerned largely with its impact on office environments. This article presents findings from a qualitative exploratory study of eleven social workers’ practices and experiences when engaged in agile working away from office spaces. Data were generated through practitioner diaries, photographs elicited from practitioners and semi-structured interviews, and were analysed using a grounded theory approach. The study found practitioners engaged in agile working in a wide range of domestic, leisure and formal work environments across the public–private continuum. This gave them superficial control over how they worked, in particular the freedom to work in solitude and establish distance between themselves and perceived demands from service users and other practitioners. However, agile working also involved a wider range of material practices and affective experiences for practitioners. These changes provoke questions about data security, increased visibility and unanticipated encounters in public spaces, and the shifting relationship between information-management work and elements of practice involving face-to-face interaction with others.

Link to Research Article: Seeking Solitude and Distance from Others: Children’s Social Workers’ Agile Working Practices and Experiences beyond the Office | The British Journal of Social Work | Oxford Academic (oup.com)

Dr Dharman Jeyasingham of University of Manchester was the lead the ESRC funded project “Becoming agile in local authority children’s safeguarding social work services: examining organisational and individual change in public sector social work”. Details on this project can be found here: GtR (ukri.org)

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Not Ageing Out of Violence? Older Mens Biographical Narratives of Their Abuse and Violence in Intimate Relationships With Female Partners

Bellamy, C. Struthers, M and Green, L (2023) Cited in Bows, H. (ed) Not Your Usual Suspect: Older Offenders of Violence (Feminist Developments in Violence and Abuse), Emerald Publishing limited, Bingley, pp. 105-119 https://doi.org/10.1108/978-1-80071-887-620231008
Abstract
Drawing on empirical research which incorporated biographical interviews with two older male perpetrators, this chapter develops theoretical conceptualisations of the histories, experiences and motives of these men. Four key areas are highlighted, which will be subject to closer scrutiny in relation to extant literature: (i) gender, particularly notions of masculinity, power and entitlement; (ii) attitudes relating to the use of violence both within intimate relationships and generally (iii) critical junctures in the life course which triggered attempts to desist; and (iv) an exploration of maturation and completion of treatment programmes in relation to their use of violence, future risks and efforts towards desistance.

Link to Research Article: Not Ageing Out of Violence? Older Men's Biographical Narratives of Their Abuse and Violence in Intimate Relationships With Female Partners | Emerald Insight

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Exploring health and social care professional initial perceptions of caring for trans patients.

Kirlew MI, Lord H, Weber J (2020) Exploring health and social care professionals’ initial perceptions of caring for trans patients. Nursing Standard. doi: 10.7748/ns.2020.e11383

Link to Research Article Resource: https://journals.rcni.com/nursing-standard/evidence-and-practice/exploring-health-and-social-care-professionals-initial-perceptions-of-caring-for-trans-patients-ns.2020.e11383/abs

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